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Sheila Hogan, left, who works for the Jewish Community Center meals on wheels program, serves a meal in November 2015 to Arnie Sherwood, who lives alone in southeast Denver
at the age of 97. (RJ Sangosti, Denver Post file)" width="495" height="335" srcset="http://blogs.denverpost.com/eletters/files/2016/01/kosher-food-270x183.jpg 270w, http://blogs.denverpost.com/eletters/files/2016/01/kosher-food.jpg 495w" sizes="(max-width: 495px) 100vw, 495px" />

Sheila Hogan, left, who works for the Jewish Community Center meals on wheels program, serves a meal in November 2015 to Arnie Sherwood, who lives alone in southeast Denver at the age of 97. (RJ Sangosti, Denver Post file)

Re: “Jewish Colorado brings kosher meals to seniors,” Jan. 3 news story.

I take great exception to the statement in your article that food delivered to Arnie Sherwood was “blessed by a rabbi before it arrived on his doorstep.”

Kosher food is not “blessed by a rabbi.” It is prepared under rabbinical supervision to be sure that it meets the standards of kashrut (being kosher) — which includes content (no non-kosher items, such as pork or shellfish), cleanliness (no bugs), and if meat, fish or fowl the health of the animal and a humane slaughter.

The statement that kosher food is “blessed by a rabbi” is not only incorrect, it has a negative and condescending tone and I have often heard people say this in mocking kosher food.

Audrey Weiss, Denver

This letter was published in the Jan. 10 edition.

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