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Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and major league baseball players Ryan Howard and Ryan Zimmerman are three of the professional athletes whose names appeared in an Al Jazeera America
report about the use of human growth hormone. (Getty and Associated Press file photos)" width="495" height="316" srcset="http://blogs.denverpost.com/eletters/files/2016/01/human-growth-hormone-270x172.jpg 270w, http://blogs.denverpost.com/eletters/files/2016/01/human-growth-hormone.jpg 495w" sizes="(max-width: 495px) 100vw, 495px" />

Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and major league baseball players Ryan Howard and Ryan Zimmerman are three of the professional athletes whose names appeared in an Al Jazeera America report about the use of human growth hormone. (Getty and Associated Press file photos)

Re: “Is athletes’ use of HGH always wrong?,” Jan. 10 editorial.

When considering the use of human growth hormone (HGH) in sports, we must keep in mind these are not free-thinking people we are talking about, they are paid athletes whose livelihood depends on one thing: their body. The physical condition required of players every week — strictly talking NFL, but could be applied to any contact sport — is almost impossible to maintain for an entire regular season. Also a lifetime of football and football injuries makes strained tendons weaker and brittle bones more fragile. To add to all of this, the mental stress on the players, like in any stressful profession, can atrophy the body physically. Coaches can get doctors to prescribe opiates for pain, benzos for anxiety and a laundry list of other drugs to help a player cope with life in the league, so why should HGH not be considered for the list?

Colton Gully, Centennial

This letter was published in the Jan. 16 edition.

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