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Charity Insight Contributor
Published 23 March 2011

Child’s i Foundation is the only charity to reach the first ever Social Brands

100 ranking, achieving the highest score for social engagement.

The Social Brands 100 study was unveiled on March 11 and conducted over a three month period by the social brand consultancy Headstream, with data and analytics by Brandwatch. The study defines a social brand as a brand which engages with the public by demonstrating a willingness to listen and communicate, while being "driven by what the community needs, not simply what the brand wants."

Child's i Foundation is a charity which provides support centres for abandoned children, as well as care for mothers and their babies, in the most poverty-stricken areas of Uganda. It uses an innovative business model which it has called 'netroots', where the internet and video technology are combined to form an online community which allows donors to see the impact of their donations.

The charity reached number 16 in the overall rankings and achieved a social engagement score of 17.80 - the highest score on the list. Social engagement was judged by examining around 30,000 tweets, posts, comments and likes and using them as the quantitative basis for the score.

The report picks out Child's i Foundation for special consideration, stating that: "Reaching the highest Social Engagement Score in our ranking shows that the way Child's i Foundation is going about its work is a direct reflection of a strategic commitment revolving around true, authentic, transparent and compelling engagement with the community."

In a diverse list, computer and PC manufacturer Dell came at the top of the rankings with a social brand score of 53.10, followed by Nike Plus and Starbucks in positions two and three respectively.

Ben Hamilton

Pic source: Child i Foundation

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